Essay ethnic background

Today we’re launching an interface element that makes these interconnections even more visible to readers: a new “Context” button. Clicking this button, located in the top-right of the page, reveals all paths within which the current item resides as well as all items that tag it. Links are provided to those tags as well as to the current page within other paths, allowing readers to treat those pages as akin to subway stations, getting on/off distinct, but related, narratives, arguments or collections (see figure below). The  new “Context” button thus allows readers to better understand the multiple contexts within which the author has situated the current item and makes it easier for them to switch those contexts.
A representation of intersecting paths in Scalar. Left: red pages are the same page residing on multiple paths, as are the brown pages. Right: our new “Context” button allows readers to link to and from the same page on multiple paths.

Since my school did not offer remedial English classes for immigrant students, I began studying with only the help of an English-Korean dictionary. Although I was focused and determined, streams of below average grades accompanied my first year in school. Nonetheless, by expending two to three times the effort of others, I started to notice signs of improvement. A well-timed vote of confidence came from my seventh-grade reading instructor, Mr. John Smith. In his class, the highest possible grade — a B — was given to only one student per school year. Aiming for that coveted prize, I managed to improve my grades from a D in the first semester to the B in the final semester. At the year-end award ceremony, Mr. Smith specifically commended my achievement in front of the student body. While I received many other academic accolades in later years, no one validated my efforts and boosted my self-confidence more than that short yet significant praise.

In college, as I became more politically engaged, my interest began to gravitate more towards political science. The interest in serving and understanding people has never changed, yet I realized I could make a greater difference doing something for which I have a deeper passion, political science. Pursuing dual degrees in both Psychology and Political Science, I was provided an opportunity to complete a thesis in Psychology with Dr. Sheryl Carol a Professor in Social Psychology at the University of Texas (UT) This fall I will complete an additional thesis as a McNair Scholar with Dr. Ken Chambers, Associate Professor in Latin American studies in the UT Political Science Department.

The Hispanic category is described on census forms as an origin, not a race—in fact, Hispanics can be of any race. But question wording does not always fit people’s self-identity; census officials acknowledge confusion on the part of many Hispanics over the way race is categorized and asked about. Although Census Bureau officials have tinkered with wording and placement of the Hispanic question in an attempt to persuade Hispanics to mark a standard race category, many do not. In the 2010 census, 37% of Hispanics— million people—said they belonged to “some other race.” Among those who answered the race question this way in the 2010 census, % were Hispanic. And among those Hispanics who did, % indicated on the form that Mexican, Mexican American or Mexico was their race, % wrote in Hispanic or Hispano or Hispana, and 10% wrote in Latin American or Latino or Latin. 31 Possible New Combined Race-Hispanic Question Leading up to the 1980 census, the Census Bureau tested a new approach to measuring race and ethnicity that combined standard racial classifications with Hispanic categories in one question. But at the time, the bureau didn’t seriously consider using this approach for future censuses. 32 That option is on the table again, however, because of concerns that many Hispanics and others have been unsure how to answer the race question on census forms. 33 In the 2010 census, the nation’s third-largest racial group is Americans (as noted above, mainly Hispanics) who said their race is “some other race.” The “some other race” group, intended to be a small residual category, outnumbers Asians, American Indians and Americans who report two or more races.

Essay ethnic background

essay ethnic background

The Hispanic category is described on census forms as an origin, not a race—in fact, Hispanics can be of any race. But question wording does not always fit people’s self-identity; census officials acknowledge confusion on the part of many Hispanics over the way race is categorized and asked about. Although Census Bureau officials have tinkered with wording and placement of the Hispanic question in an attempt to persuade Hispanics to mark a standard race category, many do not. In the 2010 census, 37% of Hispanics— million people—said they belonged to “some other race.” Among those who answered the race question this way in the 2010 census, % were Hispanic. And among those Hispanics who did, % indicated on the form that Mexican, Mexican American or Mexico was their race, % wrote in Hispanic or Hispano or Hispana, and 10% wrote in Latin American or Latino or Latin. 31 Possible New Combined Race-Hispanic Question Leading up to the 1980 census, the Census Bureau tested a new approach to measuring race and ethnicity that combined standard racial classifications with Hispanic categories in one question. But at the time, the bureau didn’t seriously consider using this approach for future censuses. 32 That option is on the table again, however, because of concerns that many Hispanics and others have been unsure how to answer the race question on census forms. 33 In the 2010 census, the nation’s third-largest racial group is Americans (as noted above, mainly Hispanics) who said their race is “some other race.” The “some other race” group, intended to be a small residual category, outnumbers Asians, American Indians and Americans who report two or more races.

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